Monthly Archives: February 2015

What 10 Books Should Be In This Bookstore?

Think on this one...

Think on this one…

Howdy! Okay, this is quick. I need advice on the inventory of a bookstore (long story): if you could put just 10 books (I need sci-fi/fantasy mostly, but any books) into this bookstore, what would they be? What writers can NOT BE MISSED? I actually need input, so please respond to this.

Thank you in advance! Until next time…

Leonard Nimoy Dies at 83

This is a bad day. A very bad day.

Geekritique

Leonard Nimoy, known best for his portrayal of Spock in the original Star Trek series, died this morning at his home in Bel Air, Los Angeles. He was 83. His wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, announced that his death came at the grip of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

For a full and proper obituary, visit New York Times site.

I think it’s high time for a Star Trek rewatch. His memory amongst friends, family, and fans will undoubtedly live long and prosper.

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Comic Review: Planet Red Hulk

SMASH!

SMASH!

Howdy! This is like the 3rd time I’ve tried to write this post, it keeps disappearing from my drafts, but anyway: I haven’t written any comic reviews in a while, so I decided to write about Planet Red Hulk, written by Jeff Parker.

Red Hulk is old Hulk antagonist Thunderbolt Ross, turned into his least favorite thing in the universe (voluntarily, by the way) and punching stuff in the FACE. This volume introduced 2 new, kind of awesome antagonists: Ross’s old army protege Reginald Fortean, who serves the same role Ross played in Green Hulk storylines (Captain Ahab type using military tech to track down and kill the Hulk) , but is much better at it, which is nice. Also, there’s a cyborg-type being from a lab accident in an earlier volume (which I did not read) called Zero/One. I can’t really understand her motives, but she’s a pretty cool villainess, and her and her unwitting henchman are easily the most interesting characters in the comic. Here’s a picture.

Zero/One.

Also, the Hulk is in a space accident and wakes up on a strange planet where he has to deal with being the “chosen” of some people while defeating a tyrant and fighting as a gladiator. If this sounds exactly like Planet Hulk, the earlier Green Hulk epic tale, that’s because it is. And they recognize and explain that (weirdly, but they do).

Okay, let me get this out of the way: under no circumstances should anyone read this book who has not already read Planet Hulk at least twice. Okay? Planet Hulk is vastly better in every way, and is basically required reading for anyone who cares about comics enough to make it this far into my review. It’s really good, and there is a lot of punching.

THAT SAID: If you’ve read Planet Hulk, this’ll be fun. More punching, and Zero/One and Fortean continue to be awesome villains. This is a total therapy read. After the worst Monday of your life, read Planet Red Hulk. You know.

That’s it for now, folks. (I did NOT steal Porky Pig’s catchphrase there. Hah.)

It’s kind of my one-year anniversary!

Hi! So this marks 365 days since I started this blog… sort of. I wrote a few posts, then between May and October I did literally nothing for some reason, then I started writing again. So I’m actually celebrating in October, but I thought I’d mark the day.

Random thought: I’ve been watching The Flash on Hulu, and where the hell does he live? I don’t think I’ve seen inside his house once in 9 episodes. What is this?

Ciao!

Book Review: Cult Fiction, by James and Brendan Dwyer

Sooooo nerdy.

Sooooo nerdy.

Hi! Been kind of a while and I’m running out of things to think about, so I’m reviewing a book I read like last August. I bought it at a convention out of sheer curiosity. So anyway:

Cult Fiction is the tale of 2 Irish brothers who were sick of all the virtual reality stories and wanted to write one where pop culture was made actually real. So they up and wrote it. Set in a future on its way to becoming a dystopia, this book centers around Municipal City, a city-state where a bunch of rich geeks made every nerdy thing they could think of a reality: magic, Transformers, Pokemon, whatever. They simulate everything in this one area. After passing a fantastically nerdy 256-question test (get it?), new citizens can pick a character, and become that character as fully as possible (or just do their own thing). We follow a Tifa Lockhart tribute through the 90s sector (yes, decades have sectors) through the city as she interacts with the world.

This book… kind of made me uncomfortable. It was, like, the Dwyer brothers wrote the closest approximation to their entire souls they could come up with on the page, and now I’m reading it. You could tell how much love was poured into every page-as James Dwyer says in this interview (don’t know how to insert links into posts, so I’ll stick it at the bottom of the page), it’s “almost sexual, really”. All that makes it really, really hard not to love. On the other hand, it’s not written so well. Exposition is shoehorned in annoyingly and at really inopportune times, it was kind of cliched (I know there were times when it was supposed to be cliche, and I enjoyed that, but the rest of it was just annoying), the characters were… well, not bad, actually, but not great either. In the same interview, Dwyer suggests that inner turmoil and description are like a writer “masturbating his imagination on top of your face”, and he lives up to that. There’s almost none of either. All in all, it’s not a great book, but I love it anyway. I love the references, and it’s just so sincere you can’t help but enjoy it. (And the fight scenes are pretty good, too). I’m definitely reading Part 2 when it comes out.

Guess that’s it. Thanks for reading!

Link to interview: https://www.smashwords.com/interview/brendandwyer

Book Review: Station Eleven, by Emily St. John Mandel

Unknown

Hi! This post was originally going to be about the news about Spider-Man joining the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but you already know that, right? (Awesome, and I don’t care what Marvel-Movie-Maniac says in the post I reblogged below this one-rendering my take on the news even more unnecessary. Grrrr. That post ruined my day.) Anyway, so I’m reviewing this book Station Eleven, which I read a while ago and really, really enjoyed. Here goes:

I encountered this book as “the postapocalyptic novel for people who hate postapocalyptic novels”, which is true. But it’s also the post apocalyptic novel for people who love post apocalyptic novels, and for those who’ve never read one before in their lives. It follows three lives at different times: a movie star and his love life in our world, a paparazzo in training to be a paramedic   and his life as a new and terrifying disease sweeps the planet, and a member of a troop of traveling Shakespearean actors and musicians after the apocalypse (it would have reminded me of The Walking Dead if I watched that show, so I guess it reminded me of… the way The Walking Dead seems to feel from the parodies I’ve seen? Or something). It’s so well written that I barely noticed the world crumbling for much of the book because I was too interested in the characters. Almost every character is sympathetic, compelling, and hard to stop reading about. My exception to this rule was the pre-apocalypse movie star, Arthur Leander. He wasn’t as fleshed out as I felt he could have been. We learn much about him from the eyes of others, which is an interesting device, but makes the others more interesting than him. Okay, he was interesting-ish, but you had to work to see any depth. I’m a lazy reader. I like the writer to show me where to find the depth in a character without a wild goose-chase. So flippin’ sue me. You’ll still love this book. Probably, Okay, this is getting long. Read the book. There. Done.

Thanks for reading! Join me next time, when I’ll review… something else, probably.

Spiderman coming to the MCU… And why it’s an ‘AMBITIOUS’ idea.

SUPER MOVIE MANIAC

Don’t get me wrong, Kevin Fiege must clearly know what he’s doing… but this is crazy!

So, the short-lived Amazing Spiderman series has pretty much come to an end (just when it was gaining traction), Andrew Garfield has gone “bye-byes”, and the webslinger is being revamped once again and shoved into the already-established MCU.

This is brilliant news right? Eh, well on the outside of course it’s brilliant news. From a realistic point of view I’d much rather leave him out. Before you bite my head off hear me out… I love Spiderman, I used to run around as a kid and pretend to be him, I just worry about how well he’ll be implemented into the MCU when it’s already neck-deep in intertwining main characters.

Back when The Amazing Spiderman films were announced I was sceptical. I loved the old trilogy with Toby McGwire and I didn’t want to…

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